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“The only thing necessary for these diseases to the triumph is for good people and governments to do nothing.”

 

HIV/AIDS & Hepatitis:
Military

 

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"Data was collected from medical treatment facility blood banks and clinical laboratories, from prevention medicine services, and from the references at WRAIR. The reporting of patient data by the preventative medicine services was mandated by OTSG, but compliance varied from post to post. In the absence of patient data from preventative medical resources, only hepatitis C virus antibody tests results were known for an individual."

While the Pentagon disbanded the hepatitis C registry for military personnel in 1993, after concluding that the infection rate was only one percent, recent studies indicate that military veterans have the highest hepatitis C rate in the nation.

Statistics by the American Liver Foundation show that 1.8 percent of the U.S. population is Hepatitis C positive. Twelve to 14 percent of those infected are veterans." from Hepatitis C Origin Points to Possible Military Link

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Allies of AIDS: Among warring factions in Congo, disease is mutating

Kampala, Uganda-It was born out of war, spread in war and may now be mutating into an explosive nightmare amid war. HIV, soldiers, rape and prostitutes: These are the elements that spawned and spread Africa's horrendous AIDS epidemic. For at least thirty years military forces have served as mobile vectors for the deadly virus. Today, HIV has found unwitting allies in the war raging in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

 

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN Department of the Army control plan- To prescribe policies, responsibilities and procedures for implementation of the Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan (BBPECP) to meet the letter and intent of the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). OSHA has enacted this standard to "reduce occupational exposure to Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and other bloodborne pathogens". This plan details measures WRAMC and its employees will take to decrease the risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens and provide appropriate treatment and counseling should an employee be exposed to bloodborne pathogens.  

Epidemiology of viral hepatitis among US Navy and Marine Corps personnel, 1984-85

Six hundred and twenty-nine cases of viral hepatitis (A, B, and NonA-NonB) were reported among a total of 768,832 United States Navy and Marine Corps personnel during 1984 and 1985 via a passive surveillance system.

 

Hepatitis C Origin Points to Possible Military Link

Hepatitis, not Hepatitis C, was a serious medical condition for military personnel during the Vietnam War.  Thousands of servicemen contracted the disease and the Pentagon was determined to do something about it to resolve a drain on combat readiness.

 

Veterans and Hepatitis C Virus

The 106th Congress was one of the most veteran friendly in our nation’s history.  Not only did we provide a record amount of funding for veterans health care, we also updated and expanded veterans health care and education benefits. 

 

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